Corticosteroid use during pregnancy and risk of orofacial clefts

The most commonly reported side effects were: oral thrush , nausea , headache , and pain in the pharynx or larynx . More rarely reported side effects (occurring in <1% of patients during the clinical trial) include: tachycardia , palpitations , dry mouth , allergic reaction ( bronchospasm , dermatitis , hives ), pharyngitis , muscle spasms , tremor , dizziness , insomnia , nervousness , and hypertension . Patients experiencing an allergic reaction or increase in difficulty breathing while using this medication should immediately discontinue its use and contact their physician. [4]

Direct intravenous injection:
Use only methylprednisolone sodium succinate.
Reconstitute with provided diluent or add 2 ml of bacteriostatic water (with benzyl alcohol) for injection.
May be administered undiluted.
Administer directly into a vein over 3—15 minutes. Doses >= 2 mg/kg or 250 mg should be given by intermittent infusion (see below), unless the potential benefits of direct IV injection outweigh the potential risks (., life-threatening shock).
 
Intermittent intravenous infusion:
Use only methylprednisolone sodium succinate.
Dilute in D5W, % Sodium Chloride (NS), or D5NS injection. Haze may form upon dilution.
Infuse over 15—60 minutes. Large doses (., >= 500 mg) should be administered over at least 30—60 minutes.

Corticosteroid use during pregnancy and risk of orofacial clefts

corticosteroid use during pregnancy and risk of orofacial clefts

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